Photo African American

AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO


AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO

AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO   AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO
An original cabinet card photo of an African American gentleman by a former Confederate corporal who apparently moved from AR to AL in 1892 with pencil writing on back which I couldn't decipher other than the photographer's price and quantity notes and the name "Emma" measuring approximately 6 3/8 x 4 1/4 inches as a complete piece. Limestone County AlArchives Photo Tombstone.....

Jpg Image file size: 47.3 Kb Corp. Haggard CO C (or G) McGhee's ARK CAV.

20, 1846 Apr 19, 1926 CSA marker Located in the back of the cemetery west of Gate 1 and west of the Donnell family plot which is enclosed in an iron fence. There are 3 Haggard graves; W. Haggard, Lucy Sewell Haggard, and William Haggard. The Coming of the Storm in Limestone County.

Larimore, Creath, and the brethren from Bethel could have all anticipated the storm to come in the Athens church. The issues of the Missionary Society and Instrumental Music in the Lords churches were uprooting and severing churches all over the country. Fortunately, the Athens brethren avoided the trouble until about 1900. Records have been kept of the formal planting and first meeting of the Athens church in 1893. As mentioned before, Larimore held a meeting in the Courthouse in 1888.

Christians met in 1892 in the city, when W. Haggard moved to Athens to open his Photography Studio. Haggard was a Christian, and was interested in helping the cause in Athens any way he could. Meeting in Haggards upstairs studio on the west side of the Courthouse Square in Athens, the Christians had their first real home since they had begun meeting together in the Courthouse and Town hall in the early 1870s. In 1893, the Athens Post records the Athens church of Christ as the only church of Christ in the city. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Battle of Little Blue River. Battle of Byram's Ford. Battle of Marais des Cygnes. The 44th Arkansas Infantry (Mounted) (18641865) was a Confederate Army. During the American Civil War. While authorized by the State Military Board as an infantry regiment, the unit was mounted for Price's Missouri Expedition. And was officially designated as mounted infantry, but this designation was almost never used by the unit. When a numerical designation is used, the unit is sometimes referred to as the 29th Arkansas Cavalry Regiment. The unit is most often referred as McGehee's Arkansas Cavalry Regiment. For its commander, James H. McGehee is often spelled McGhee in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. The exact date of organization of the 44th Arkansas Mounted infantry remains obscure. Some sources state that the unit was organized in the fall of 1863, but it is likely that the unit was organized during the summer of 1864 along with the 45th through the 48th Mounted Infantry Regiments.

It is known that James H. McGehee began his military service in a volunteer militia company organized in the 30th Arkansas Militia Regiment in Crittenden County, Arkansas. The Crittenden Rangers became Company C of the 6th Arkansas Cavalry Battalion, which was eventually expanded to a full regiment and designated the 2nd Arkansas Cavalry Regiment (Slemons's). It is unclear how long McGehee served with the 6th Battalion, but by January 1863 he was apparently a Captain commanding an unnamed, unattached company of cavalry which was operating along the Mississippi River.

Captain McGehee stated in his after action report that he was acting under orders to reconnoiter the area, "burning cotton in that country and annoying the enemy on the Mississippi River" wherever possible. McGehee and his men were responsible for burning at least two steam ships. On January 6, 1863 McGehee's troops captured and burned steamboat Jacob Musselman.

Near Memphis, later they also intercepted and burned the steamer Grampus No. The operations by McGehee led Union Official to make a raid and burn the homes of suspected bushwhackers. In Mound City, and Hopefield Arkansas. By September 1863, McGehee's Company had joined with other semi-independent companies under Colonel Archibald S. To form Dobbins 1st Arkansas Cavalry Regiment.

McGehee's Company became Company C, and probably remained with the regiment unit for the winter of 1863 when Colonel Dobbins was court-martialed and dismissed from the service because he refused to accept orders from General John S. Because Marmaduke had killed Brigadier General L.

Walker in a duel just before the Battle of Little Rock. The official records indicate that the regiment was broken up about January 3, 1864, and elements of the regiment were attached to, but not formally consolidated with, Col. It may be that this is the point at which McGehee began organizing his own regiment.

In May 1864, General J. Shelby occupied northeast Arkansas, well behind Union Army lines. In early June 1864, General Shelby commissioned several officers to begin raising regiments in Northeast Arkansas. By June 13, Shelby reported to General Sterling Price that recruiting efforts were bearing fruit. The decreasing availability of fodder for horses in 1864 led the Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department to issue an order proscribing the raising of additional mounted regiments in Arkansas.

However, when General Sterling Price. Received authorization to conduct a campaign in Missouri that fall, several of the new regiments were mounted in order to accompany him. As a result, the 44th.

45th, 46th, 47th, and 48th. Were officially mounted infantry regiments instead of cavalry regiments.

They were rarely referred to in contemporary reports and orders by numerical designation. Price referred to them as McGehee's Cavalry, Crabtree's Cavalry, etc. Which eventually resulted in their later being referred to as 44th Cavalry, 46th Cavalry, etc. The unit was composed of companies from the following counties. Company A, Commanded by Captain I.

Deadrick , organized at Vandale, in Cross, Arkansas. Company B, Commanded by Captain Thomas P. Wilson, organized in Woodruff County, Arkansas. Company C, Commanded by Captain W. Ward, organized in Independence County, Arkansas.

Company D, Commanded by First Lieutenant S. Leonard organized in Poinsett County, Arkansas. Company E, Commanded by Captain J. Levesque, organized in Poinsett County, Arkansas. Company F, Commanded by Captain F. Company G, Commanded by Captain Christopher Y. Steen, organized in Jacksonport, Jackson County, Arkansas. Company H, Commanded by First Lieutenant William White, organized in White County Arkansas. Company I, Commanded by Second Lieutenant J. Patterson, organized at Taylor's Creek in St.

Officer appointments in the 40-series regiments date from the June to August 1864 timeframe, so it is assumed that the regiments were mustered into service about the same time at various points in northeast Arkansas. The list of regimental officers follows. Matthees, Teel - Assistant Quartermaster. There are no known muster rolls of the 44th Arkansas Mounted Infantry and no record of enlistments. Apart from a few prisoner of war records, the records of this regiment consist of paroles of soldiers who surrendered at Jacksonport, Arkansas on June 5, 1865.

The 44th was assigned to Colonel Dobbins brigade, of Maj. S division, of Sterling Price. For Price's Missouri Expedition.

(commonly referred to as Price's Raid). The most fierce fighting that the 44th was engaged in during the raid occurred on October 23 at the Battle of Westport. Union General Blunt's position at the Wornall House was formidable. His three brigades occupied positions behind a stone wall, some three hundred yards in front of the Confederate line. A wide road, bordered on either side by stone walls, led to a farm house on top of a hill. In the road just over the hill there was a gun section of McLain's Colorado Battery. In position and firing into the Confederate troops at the bottom of the hill. As the Confederate lines were reforming and being placed in position by Brigadier General Jo Shelby, Major General Fagan rode up at the head of his escort.

Fagan looked at the battery a moment through his field glasses and said: Shelby, I propose to take that battery. Have a regiment of cavalry to form in platoons and charge up the line and support the charge on foot. Colonel McGehee, commanding the 44th Arkansas, about three hundred strong, formed by platoons, which filled the lane with a living mass of cavalry. As the 44th Arkansas charged up the lane, Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Walker led the 16th Kansas Cavalry and 2nd Colorado Cavalry against Colonel McGehee. Two squadrons of the 2nd Colorado under Green also struck the column's left.

The 16th Kansas met them in the road, meanwhile Company E of the 15th Kansas Cavalry, struck across the field and reached the lower end of the lane, thus hemming in McGehee's troopers and intercepting any retreat. One of the few instances of individual combat between opposing commanders during the war occurred during the charge of the 44th Arkansas on McLain's Colorado Battery. Colonel McGhee encountered Captain Curtis Johnson, commanding Company E, 15th Kansas Cavalry. Both men pulled revolvers and charged toward one another, and both were wounded.

Captain Johnson was shot in the arm. Colonel McGhee was listed as having been killed in a report filled by Colonel Charles R.

Jennison of the 15th Kansas Cavalry. But this report proved to be false. Colonel McGhee was wounded a second time two days later at the Battle of Mine Creek. And he was forced to relinquish command to Lieutenant Colonel Jesse S.

Grider, but McGhee survived the wounds and the war, living in Arkansas until at least 1870. Observed the fight reported that the gallant charge had been a disaster for the men that made it. McGehee's attack resulted in the loss to the Confederates of thirty-five prisoners, nineteen dead and thirty-seven wounded. After the completion of Price's raid, the 44th was furloughed to return to the area from which it was recruited in order to forage and recover absentees and to return to the army at a prescribed date. At Boonsborough, on the suggestion of General Fagan, I detached two of his brigades (McCray's and Dobbin's), along with Freeman's brigade, of Marmaduke's division, to take the route to Northeast Arkansas, with instructions to collect all stragglers and deserters, and report south of the Arkansas River, at or near Washington, by the 15th, 20th, and 25th days of December, respectively.

A scouting report made by Major Harris S. Greeno, of the 4th Arkansas Cavalry U. Army, November 15, 1864, made from Devalls Bluff relayed information on the post raid condition of Fagan's Division of Arkansas Cavalry. Greeno's information came from deserters and captured Confederate soldiers who had served in Price's Army.

Of these two thirds of the men have deserted and they will never go out again. They have thrown away their arms and are nearly all at their homes.

They are all greatly demoralized and discouraged. Commander of the Military Sub-District of Northeast Arkansas and Southeast Missouri, to which the 45th Arkansas was assigned at the close of the war, surrendered his command at Chalk Bluff, Arkansas. On May 11, 1865, and agreed to have his men assemble at Wittsburg and Jacksonport, Arkansas.

To lay down their arms and receive their paroles. Thompson's command was widely dispersed throughout northeast Arkansas, more for reasons of available forage than anything else.

About a third of his men refused to surrender. Shelby's Missouri Brigade, along with elements of Green's and Jackman's Missouri Brigades, lit out for Mexico. Some Missouri units disbanded rather than surrender their colors. Many men simply went home.

The 45th Arkansas Cavalry surrendered with its command structure intact and was paroled at Jacksonport on June 5, 1865. At the time of the surrender, the regiment was assigned to the Military Sub-District of Northeast Arkansas and Southeast Missouri, commanded by Brigadier General M.

Thompson (Surrendered at Jacksonport), Dobbins Brigade, commanded by Colonel Col. (Surrendered at Jacksonport), 44th Arkansas Mounted Infantry, commanded by Colonel James H. Sellers: Add a FREE map to your listings. The item "AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO" is in sale since Saturday, March 9, 2019.

This item is in the category "Collectibles\Photographic Images\Vintage & Antique (Pre-1940)\Cabinet Photos". The seller is "theprimitivefold" and is located in Villa Park, Illinois. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, South Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi arabia, United arab emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Costa rica, Panama, Trinidad and tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint kitts and nevis, Turks and caicos islands, Bangladesh, Brunei darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macao, Martinique, Nicaragua, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Viet nam, Uruguay, South africa, Colombia, Antigua and barbuda, Saint lucia, Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman islands, Sri lanka, Maldives, Oman, Reunion, Montserrat.

  1. Original/Reprint: Original Print
  2. Subject: Ethnic
  3. Date of Creation: Pre-1950
  4. Size Type/Largest Dimension: Small (Up to 7")
  5. Signed?: Signed
  6. Listed By: Dealer or Reseller
  7. Region of Origin: US
  8. Photo Type: Cabinet Photo
  9. Framing: Unframed
  10. Color: Sepia

AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO   AFRICAN AMERICAN ATHENS AL CSA VET PHOTOGRAPHER HAZZARD 44th AR INF McGHEE PHOTO